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Mold Removal & Remediation near New York, New York

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Lawrence Environmental Group, LLC

350 Lexington Ave, 12th Floor PH
New York, NY 10016

IAQ Practitioner, Laboratory Services, other

Blue Chip Building Maintenance

242 W 30th St
New York, NY 10001

NDR - Water Removal Specialists

1286 1st Ave
New York, NY 10021

Johnson Controls Inc

250 Vesey St
New York, NY 10281

All Boro Cleaning

355 Pleasant Ave
New York, NY 10035

MPW Ind Svc

320 E 40th St
New York, NY 10016

Fratoni's Cleaning Svc

120 Fulton St
New York, NY 10038

All City Management Inc

517 W 47th St
New York, NY 10036

Johnson Controls Inc

1180 Avenue Of The Americas
New York, NY 10036

JLC Environmental Consultants, Inc.

30 W. 26th Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10010

IAQ Practitioner, Laboratory Services, Health & Safety Professional

New York City Mold Remediation Procedures

Three different sizes of remediation and the remediation of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are described below. Currently, existing research does not relate the amount of mold growth to the frequency or severity of health effects. However, as the presence of moldy materials increases, so does the potential for exposure8 and the need to limit the spread of mold-containing dusts and worker exposures. As such, the size of the area impacted by mold growth as well as practical considerations were used to help define remedial procedures.

Since the following areas were arbitrarily selected, site-specific conditions must be considered in choosing adequate remediation procedures. For more information on the unique characteristics of building types and occupancies that may influence remediation procedures refer to the American Industrial Hygiene Association’s publication, “Recognition, Evaluation, and Control of Indoor Mold.”

Small Isolated Areas (less than 10 square feet) – e.g. ceiling tiles, small areas on walls

  1. Remediation can be conducted by trained building maintenance staff. Such persons should receive training on proper cleaning methods, personal protection, and potential health hazards associated with mold exposure. This training can be performed as part of a program to comply with the requirements of the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200).
  2. Respiratory protection (e.g., N-95 disposable respirator), in accordance with the OSHA respiratory protection standard (29 CFR 1910.134), is recommended. Gloves and eye protection should also be worn.
  3. The work area should be unoccupied.
  4. If work may impact difficult-to-clean surfaces or items (e.g. carpeting, electronic equipment), the floor of the work area, egress pathways, and other identified materials/belongings should be removed or covered with plastic sheeting and sealed with tape before remediation.
  5. Efforts should be made to reduce dust generation. Dust suppression methods particularly during any cutting or resurfacing of materials are highly recommended. Methods to consider include: cleaning or gently misting surfaces with a dilute soap or detergent solution prior to removal; the use of High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) vacuum-shrouded tools; or using a vacuum equipped with a HEPA filter at the point of dust generation. Work practices that create excessive dust should be avoided.
  6. Moldy materials that can be cleaned should be cleaned using a soap or detergent solution. Materials that cannot be cleaned should be removed from the building in a sealed plastic bag(s). Plastic sheeting should be discarded after use. There are no special requirements for the disposal of moldy materials.
  7. The work area and areas used by workers for egress should be HEPA-vacuumed (a vacuum equipped with a High-Efficiency Particulate Air filter) or cleaned with a damp cloth and/or mop and a soap or detergent solution.
  8. All areas should be left dry and visibly free from mold, dust, and debris. Check that other quality assurance indicators (see Quality Insurance Indicators) have also been met.

 Medium-Sized Isolated Areas (10 – 100 square feet)

  1. Remediation can be conducted by trained building maintenance staff. Such persons should receive training on proper cleaning methods, personal protection, and potential health hazards associated with mold exposure. This training can be performed as part of a program to comply with the requirements of the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200).
  2. Respiratory protection (e.g., N-95 disposable respirator), in accordance with the OSHA respiratory protection standard (29 CFR 1910.134), is recommended. Gloves and eye protection should also be worn.The work area should be unoccupied.
  3. Cover the floor, egress pathways, and items left in the work area with plastic sheeting and seal with tape before remediation.
  4. Seal ventilation ducts/grills and other openings in the work area with plastic sheeting.  The HVAC system servicing this area may need to be shut down to properly seal vents.
  5. Efforts should be made to reduce dust generation. Dust suppression methods particularly during any cutting or resurfacing of materials are highly recommended. Methods to consider include: cleaning or gently misting surfaces with a dilute soap or detergent solution prior to removal; the use of High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) vacuum-shrouded tools; or using a vacuum equipped with a HEPA filter at the point of dust generation. Work practices that create excessive dust should be avoided.
  6. Moldy materials that can be cleaned should be cleaned using a soap or detergent solution. Materials that cannot be cleaned should be removed from the building in sealed plastic bags. Plastic sheeting should be discarded after use. There are no special requirements for disposal of moldy materials.
  7. The work area and areas used by workers for egress should be HEPA-vacuumed and cleaned with a damp cloth and/or mop and a soap or detergent solution.
  8. All areas should be left dry and visibly free from mold, dust, and debris. Check that other quality assurance indicators (see Quality Insurance Indicators) have also been met.

 

Large Areas (greater than 100 square feet in a contiguous area) – e.g. on separate walls in a single  room 

Properly trained and equipped mold remediation workers should conduct the remediation. The presence of a trained building or environmental health professional (see Environmental Assessment) to provide oversight during remediation may be helpful to ensure quality work and compliance with the work plan. The following procedures are recommended:

  1. Personnel trained in the handling of mold-damaged materials equipped with:
    1. A minimum of half-face elastomeric respirators with P-100 filters used in accordance with the OSHA respiratory protection standard (29 CFR1910.134)
    2. Full body coveralls with head and foot coverings
    3. Gloves and eye protection
  2. Containment of the affected area:
    1. The HVAC system servicing this area should be shut down during remediation.
    2. Isolation of the work area using plastic sheeting sealed with duct tape.  Furnishings should be removed from the area. Ventilation ducts/grills, any other openings, and remaining fixtures/furnishings should be covered with plastic sheeting sealed with duct tape.
    3. Consider using an exhaust fan equipped with a HEPA filter to generate negative pressurization.
    4. Consider using airlocks and a clean changing room.
    5. Egress pathways should also be covered if a clean changing room is not used.
  3. The work area should be unoccupied.
  4. Efforts should be made to reduce dust generation. Dust suppression methods particularly during any cutting or resurfacing of materials are highly recommended. Methods to consider include: cleaning or gently misting surfaces with a dilute soap or detergent solution prior to removal; the use of High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) vacuum-shrouded tools; or using a vacuum equipped with a HEPA filter at the point of dust generation. Work practices that create excessive dust should be avoided.
  5. Moldy materials, that can be cleaned, should be cleaned using a soap or detergent solution. Materials that cannot be cleaned should be removed from the building in sealed plastic bags. The outside of the bags should be cleaned with a damp cloth and a soap or detergent solution or HEPA-vacuumed in the work area (or clean changing room) prior to their transport to unaffected areas of the building. There are no special requirements for the disposal of moldy materials.
  6. Before leaving isolated areas, workers should remove disposable clothing to prevent the tracking of mold-containing dusts outside of the work area.
  7. The work area and egress pathways (and clean changing room if present) should be HEPA-vacuumed and cleaned with a damp cloth and/or mop with a soap or detergent solution and be visibly clean prior to the removal of isolation barriers. Plastic sheeting should be discarded after use.
  8. All areas should be left dry and visibly free from mold, dust, and debris. Check that other quality assurance indicators (see Quality Insurance Indicators) have also been met.

In Precedent-Setting Case, Company Settles with EPA on Charges that "Mildew-Proof" Paint is Unregistered Pesticide; Agrees to Pay $46,000 Penalty and Change Labels and Promo Material

 

Release date: 12/07/2000

Contact Information: 

 

(#00219) New York, N.Y. -- William Zinsser & Company, Inc., the Somerset, New Jersey-based paint manufacturer, has settled with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on charges that it sold "mildew-proof" paint that was not registered with EPA as a pesticide. The agency maintained that the sale of the product violated the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the law that regulates pesticides. This is the first settlement in the nation of charges against a paint manufacturer for making unsubstantiated "mildew-proof" pesticidal claims about a paint product on the label, in hard-copy advertising and in promotional material on the Internet. The company has agreed to pay a penalty of $46,000 within 45 days, and to make permanent changes to the paint’s label and promotional material.

"We are pleased that this matter has been resolved, and expect manufacturers of similar products to take note," said Jeanne M. Fox, EPA Regional Administrator. "Our goal is to stop the recent trend of companies making unsubstantiated claims that their products destroy bacteria, mold, mildew and fungus, and this settlement is a major step in that direction."

A May 1999 EPA inspection of the Zinsser facility at 173 Belmont Drive in Somerset and information supplied by the company revealed that it sold "Perma-White Mildew-Proof Bathroom Paint" in both semi-gloss and satin finishes on 15 occasions in April 1999. Labels on the Perma-White paint cans and promotional literature made pesticidal claims like: "Guaranteed mildew-proof"; "After five years, no sign of mildew on this Perma-White ceiling of a bathroom"; and "Even damp, masonry basement walls can be painted with Perma-White to prevent mildew growth so common in these areas." The company also used a "buster" symbol to imply the product prevented mildew, with the words "mildew-proof" appearing nearby. Zinsser’s promotional materials and labels implied that the paint could protect other items – in this case walls and ceilings – from mildew. Had the company instead claimed that an EPA-registered pesticide used in the paint protected only the paint film itself from mildew, the sale of the product would not have violated FIFRA, as EPA charged.

This is due to FIFRA’s "treated article exemption," which states that any product treated with or containing a pesticide registered by EPA to protect the product itself – like wood treated with a pesticide to protect it from infestation or a paint treated with a pesticide to protect the paint coating itself – need not be registered separately with EPA as a pesticide. According to EPA, because of the claims Zinsser made, the Mildew-Proof paint did not meet the treated article exemption and its sale as an unregistered pesticide was a violation of FIFRA. EPA’s September 1999 complaint against Zinsser charged 15 separate FIFRA violations – once for each sale in April 1999. In its response to the complaint, the company stated that it believed that its Mildew-Proof paint did qualify as a treated article.

In settlement with the agency, Zinsser will undertake the following in addition to paying a $46,000 penalty: 

  • Within 30 days, Zinsser will put a disclaimer reading "This product contains a mildewcide to prevent the growth of mildew on the paint film only" on all newly manufactured Mildew-Proof containers.  After February 11, 2001, all newly manufactured cans of Mildew-Proof paint must bear a new label and lid label based on a model approved by EPA. The new label must include an asterisk after every "mildew-proof" claim, referring to a prominent disclaimer on the front panel (or on the lid if a mildew-proof claim appears there) that limits the claim to the paint film only.  
  • By February 11, 2001, point-of-sale signs in stores selling Mildew-Proof paint must bear prominent stickers of the disclaimer described in the first bullet. Signs with stickers must remain in stores until all existing stock of product with the original label (including stock with the disclaimer) has been sold.  
  • By February 11, 2001, the company will inform its distributors and appropriate web sites about the changes to the Mildew-Proof paint label, and give EPA a list of these entities.  Zinsser will certify to EPA by July 31, 2001 that any promotional materials for or mentioning Mildew-Proof paint – including point-of-sale signs and websites – are permanently changed so that their language meets the requirements of the treated-article exemption.  The company faces additional monetary penalties if it does not comply with requirements of the agreement. 

 

William Zinsser & Company, Inc. has approximately 200 employees and annual sales of approximately $20 million. It is wholly owned by specialty coatings manufacturer RPM, Inc., which has annual sales of approximately $1.6 billion.

Services include:  Mold Removal New York – Mold Remediation New York, New York – Mold Cleanup New York, New York

Thank you for visiting our directory of New York Mold Experts powered by Environix. Below is a list of frequently asked questions our mold experts often receive.

What type of services are typically offered by a mold removal and remediation company in New York?

A professional mold remediation contractor in New York will typically offer the following services: mold removal, black mold cleanup and removal, mold remediation, toxic mold removal, mold basement removal, attic mold removal, bathroom mold cleanup and general house mold treatment.

What are the steps in a typical mold remediation project in New York area homes?

 1.) Identify the source. Without first identifying the conditions that encouraged mold growth, the remediation cannot succeed. Depending on the situation, the initial inspection is performed by an industrial hygienist, mold professional, home inspector or the remediation contractor themselves. In New York, New York you will encounter all four sources.

2.) Identify the extent. Next, it is important to identify the extent of the mold growth and water damage. Often this involves the use of moisture meters, thermal imaging and other specialized equipment. Air quality sampling can also be employed to identify the extent of the contamination.

3.) Containment. During the mold removal and remediation process the mold spores will often become disturbed and aerosolized. This can lead to cross contamination and create a situation much worse than the original problem. Therefore, mold remediation contractors in New York, New York use specialized techniques to contain the area. Often this involves the use of HEPA filtration, negative air machines and plastic sheeting.

4.) Removal. After containment is in place, the mold damaged materials are removed. Often this includes the removal of porous materials such as sheetrock, upholstered furniture, carpeting, insulation, etc.

5.) Decontamination. During a mold remediation project in New York, New York there are often materials that do not require removal. Non-porous or semi-porous materials such as wood framing, metal, plastic and concrete can be cleaned in place. HEPA vacuuming, wire brushing, sanding and other cleaning techniques are utilized to remove all remaining mold spores from the contaminated area. Often, an antimicrobial solution is applied to the remaining materials as well.

6.) Clearance Testing. Upon completion of the mold remediation and removal project a final clearance inspection is performed. This can range from simply a visual inspection of the area to a full range of air quality and surface samples. New York, New York mold removal contractors will often work with a third party inspection company to verify their work.

What should I look for in a mold remediation and mold removal contractor in New York, New York?

 1.) Licensing. Ask the contractor if they have a valid New York business license. Few states regulate the mold industry specifically, but all states require a general contractors license to perform mold remediation work.

2.)Insurance. Does the contractor have mold specific insurance coverage? Mold remediation insurance is expensive and often contractors simply have general construction insurance. This type of coverage will NOT cover any mold remediation or mold removal work.

3.)Experience. Ask the contractor how long they have been in business. Also, always ask for references from recent customers who hired the contractor for a similar project. Additionally, check the New York Better Business Bureau.

4.) Pricing. Unfortunately the mold industry is plagued by a few very unscrupulous individuals. These companies charge exorbitant rates, often suggesting work that is completely unnecessary. If the price seems unusually high or the scope of work larger than what you expected, ask for a second opinion.

Check out our Mold Removal and Mold Remediation pages for more info.

 

Local News New York City Mold

FORT MILL -- 

The Fort Mill Magistrate's Office has been closed temporarily due to mold and the potential health hazard it poses.

"We are currently working with an environmental health and safety company on sampling," said David Harmon, York County director of public works. "We found some molds in the ceiling area that's causing us some problems."

Those molds were discovered in the foyer outside the courtroom, he said.

"There are eight different types of spores that showed up in that area," he said. "We do know that that's a problem area."

The foyer isn't the only problematic area of the building at 114 Springs St.


Read more

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